Ghosts of Paul Revere

11:11 Presents

Ghosts of Paul Revere

Ezra Bell

Sun, November 17, 2019

8:00 pm

Pub Station Taproom

Billings, MT

This event is all ages

Ghost Of Paul Revere
Ghost Of Paul Revere
“Mumford & Sons meet the Avett Brothers with a twist of bluegrass. Old Crow Medicine Show with three-part harmonies. The Band for millennials… The Maine-grown, foot-stompin’ holler-folk quartet create the type of music for which festivals are made.” - The Boston Globe

Born on the banks of the Saco River, brothers in all but name, the Ghost of Paul Revere is Maine's holler-folk band. A powerful, energetic, non-traditional American folk band that’s renowned for harmony fueled, heart-pounding performances full of songs with unique identities that remain undeniably the Ghost of Paul Revere.
Formed around childhood friends Max Davis, Sean McCarthy, and Griffin Sherry, joined by Matt Young on harmonica, the Ghost of Paul Revere played their first show together in 2011 at a tiny bar in Portland, Maine. Now, they play across the nation, bringing holler-folk into houses, bars, and music halls. They have shared the stage with the Avett Brothers, The Travelin’ McCourys, Brown Bird, Spirit Family Reunion, Darlingside, as well as members of Greensky Bluegrass, the Infamous Stringdusters, and Old Crow Medicine Show.
Their critically acclaimed, Billboard charting full length album Believe, as well as their two EPs North and Field Notes Vol. 1, have continually been the top selling local albums in Maine and New Hampshire for more than four years. The Ghost of Paul Revere has since sold out Port City Music Hall, Stone Mountain Arts Center, and the Strand Theater multiple times, won Best In Maine at the 2014 New England Music Awards, were an official showcase artist at Folk Alliance International 2015 and made their Newport Folk Festival debut in August 2015. They capped off 2015 with an electrifying headline performance on New Year's eve at Portland's State Theatre in front of 1,600 enraptured fans.
In 2016, amidst touring nationally, they returned to the studio to craft their second full length album, engineered by Jonathan Wyman at Halo Studios and mastered by Adam Ayan of Gateway Mastering. The album is expected to be released in early 2017.

"Robustly played, masterful amalgamation of bluegrass, folk, and gospel for the Millennial Generation... The Ghost of Paul Revere prove that superior roots music can come from anywhere." - No Depression

"Simply put, this band is one to see live... A gorgeous blend of bluegrass, folk and good old fashioned rock and roll... their performance takes on a boot-clacking brilliance that transforms each song into a full-on participatory event, sending an electric surge about the room that’s near impossible not to feel. Add to that a layered three part harmony coursing through each soulful song, and The Ghost of Paul Revere demonstrated they not only had the chops, but the heart to reach their audience and leave an undeniable impression as well. As the floorboards shook with each pounding stomp, one thing was certain: the band announced they had arrived, loud and clear." - Dispatch Magazine

"Simply put North is an album that shouldn't be missed. (It will) make even the most callous of individuals feel the unbridled joy of Holler-Folk." - Ear to the Ground Music

"A distinguished sound that only seasoned musicians can usually attain" - Portland Press Herald

"(The Ghost of Paul Revere) stole the show. I was so impressed with them. Their harmonies, stomping percussion, and vocal power were stellar... their songs progressed from mellow to powerhouse... their harmonies are superb and their songs have power." - whatbreesees.com
Ezra Bell
Ezra Bell
Ezra Bell’s first full-length debut features ebullient soul twang, flowing and leaping like the music of a late 60s/early 70s recording of well-trained freaks dabbling in various genres. This Portland band sounds like they effortlessly recorded one of those forgotten-gem “cult albums”, despite it being early 2018.

After three well-received EPs and playing regularly in Portland since 2013, the playfully literate and cheerfully plaintive Benjamin Wuamett and his gaggle of quite fit players, conjure up a festive dusky folk-rock-blues-jazz-R&B-pop vibe that doesn’t smother out the melancholy. These haunted stories include key tracks “Tourists” (“This one is about realizing the game is rigged, but you still have to play; it’s the only game in town”); “Yawning at the Seance (“This one is about the stories we tell ourselves in order to feel like everything is okay”), and “Let Me Do the Talking.” About that last one: “The opening line is a rip-off of something the boxer Jack Johnson said when asked how he managed to so intrigue women. He said ‘eat jellied eels and think distant thoughts.’ I think it’s one of the great travesties (and a telling indictment of our society) of our time that a great man’s name has been usurped by some surfer singing about breakfast.” The glistening, giddy music on these tracks help to document the car-wreck gas-lit lifestyles Wuamett masterfully describes. He displays gleaming shards of a self-depreciative self-awareness but also someone busy getting lost. “The overall theme going into this?” Wuamett answers to what the album is about. “Desperation. A call to arms. A whimper. A declaration that being witty by yourself at 4 AM in a basement, is a poor way to live.” Ezra Bell features Maurice Spencer (bass), Tom Trotter (drums), Aaron Mattison (horns and arrangements), Honora Hildreth (backing vocals and percussion), and Jeremy Asay (keys and guitar) more-than-ably backing up Wuamett’s story-songs and satirical jigs with organic precision.

Wuamett came up with the band name when he was in Portugal and a girl he was with dared him to try a nearby concession stand’s popcorn snails. He had two full bowls. “They were delicious,” he says. “When I got back to Portland, I couldn’t sleep. On the way to work the next day, after a rainfall, I saw a slug crossing the sidewalk. I bent down and ate it raw on the spot. I didn’t go to work that day I went home, grabbed a garbage bag and spent the morning gathering snails, slugs, worms (not sure if worms fall in the mollusk family but, still, delicious) which I brought home with me. Hours later, as I sat shirtless on my couch, covered in sweat, I knew I had a problem. It would be too long a story to talk about all the places my disease took me. Suffice to say — I once hitchhiked to California because I really wanted to taste a banana slug. In the end, it became too much and I sought help via the internet. I began posting on various forums about my problem. I hadn’t been to work in weeks. Unfortunately, there are very few mollusk addicts on the web and my various inquiries went without commiseration until a nice man from Georgia spoke up and we began a long correspondence during which he shared with me the tools that had enabled him to survive in this strange world. He saved my life. His name was Ezra Bell.”
Venue Information:
Pub Station Taproom
2502 1st Ave. N
Billings, MT, 59101
http://www.thepubstation.com