Clutch-                                                                                                                                                                                                                         Book of Bad Decisions Tour 2019

11:11 Presents

Clutch- Book of Bad Decisions Tour 2019

Big Business, The Inspector Cluzo

Fri, March 1, 2019

Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

Pub Station Ballroom

Billings, MT

$31.00 - $35.00

This event is all ages

Clutch
Clutch
With the release of their highly anticipated 12th studio album, the gloriously titled “Book of Bad Decisions”, it would be easy to suggest that legendary Maryland rockers Clutch have made their finest record to date. This may even be true. You see, the thing about Clutch is that ever since their 1993 debut Transnational Speedway League they've been in the business of writing stone cold classics, and even the most rabid fan would have trouble picking just one. “Book of Bad Decisions” won't make that task any easier. Rest assured, it's another classic.

Recorded over three weeks at Sputnik Studios in Nashville, “Book of Bad Decisions” was produced by four-time Grammy winner Vance Powell (Seasick Steve, The White Stripes, Arctic Monkeys, etc.), a man who apparently knows that a one degree angle change in microphones makes a difference to how an instrument sounds. Interestingly, his name first came to the band's attention via country star Chris Stapleton.

“It started with my brother-in-law, who's a huge Chris Stapleton fan,” says drummer Jean-Paul Gaster. “He and I would listen to The Traveller quite a bit, and one thing that stood out was that it didn't sound like any other country record that I'd heard. Shortly after that I was on Spotify, and a song by The Dead Weather came up. It just blew me away and I could tell that whoever produced that record was doing things a different way. I looked it up and there was Vance Powell's name again, so something was telling us that this is a guy we should reach out to.”

“Even though Chris Stapleton does music that's not too much like our own, the sonics of the record are pretty great,” says frontman Neil Fallon. “He has a very different approach to recording; he comes from the school of live recording and engineering, and the songs, on tape, are not gonna sound that much different from what we do live.”

No stranger to the road, Powell spent three days on tour with the band in order to get a feel for what they do best, watching first from the front of house and then from the stage, checking out the live sound and how Clutch connect with their audience.

“I never go into a record having an idea of how it's gonna sound,” he says. “But after hearing them live, I had an idea of how they could sound. I'm a big live recording fan, so I like when bands play together and I didn't wanna get into that manufacturing a record concept. I wanted it to be real organic.”

Indeed, 'organic' is a word that comes up a lot when talking to Clutch about the new record, Powell taking great care to get guitar tones right and making sure that each song had its own identity.

“Vance is all about vintage guitar sounds,” says guitarist Tim Sult. “I probably had more amplifier options than on any other album we've done. It was like going back to a music store in 1960! This was the first time I've ever recorded with amps from the '50s and I ended up buying a couple of '50s amps while we were in Nashville.”

“I felt really good about the gear that I was bringing into the studio,” concurs bassist Dan Maines, “but Vance had this 1974 Ampeg and I'm so glad that he recommended that. As soon as we plugged it in, it sounded like Sabbath! We ended up using it alongside one of my amps, and I loved it so much that once we were done recording I scoured the ads for another one. What I really like is that each song has a different tone to it, and I think that's Vance Powell's style.”

With each band member contributing riffs to the album – including Jean-Paul who has added mandolin to his repertoire – there was no shortage of material, each song road-tested long before it reached the studio. Hell, with 15 songs, “Book of Bad Decisions” could easily pass as a double album! Always wary of repeating themselves and retreading old ground, there is even – for the first time on a Clutch album – a horn section that swings like James Brown's pants!

“The third night I was watching the band,” says Vance, “they did this song that at that time was called Talkbox, which is now In Walks Barbarella. While Neil was singing, I was thinking to myself, “wow, there's a horn line here!” And while he was singing, I was humming it to myself. I brought it up to them, tenuously, and they were like, “okay, let's do it!” This is as Parliament, Funkadelic as it gets, maybe even a James Brown vibe!”

One thing, however, that is entirely as expected, is that as arguably the greatest rock lyricist of modern times, Fallon, as always, has provided some interesting subject matter, everything from poets to presidents and recipes to rock 'n' roll. You may have to Google some of it, because Fallon is nothing if not a clever bugger, and likes to keep his audience on their toes.

“Most of the time I have no idea what he's talking about,” laughs Jean-Paul, “but the lyrics completely inform how I'm going to play that tune. Whether or not I understand exactly what Neil is singing about is not important. I listen to the way Neil sings those words and I think about what those words mean to me, and that, ultimately, informs how I'm gonna play drums on that song.”

“I think I probably second guess myself into doing that,” says Neil of his lyrical style. “I would rather not be able to answer all the questions, just to keep it interesting for myself. Sometimes a rhyme sounds awesome and I don't know what it means, but I'll go with it anyway. It's become more difficult to write lyrics now that I have Wikipedia at my fingertips, because you can go down rabbit hole after rabbit hole and not get anything done! Not too long ago you'd have to spend months in a public library trying to find out the things you can find in a couple of keystrokes.”

Elsewhere, however, you'll find a more straightforward approach to lyrics, A Good Fire relating the memory of hearing Black Sabbath for the first time – something that everyone can relate to – while Sonic Counselor pays homage to Clutch fans. Indeed, it's fair to say that Clutch fans – collectively known as Gearheads – are a breed like no other.

“I've always loved rock songs that just celebrated rock 'n' roll,” grins Fallon, “but that song was a bit more about the people who come to our shows, that make it as exciting for us as hopefully it is for them. My favorite shows that I've seen bands do is like going to church, especially when everybody's in sync with each other and you walk out with your jaw on the floor. I feel incredibly grateful that people have walked out of our shows and felt the same way. It's a tip of the hat to them.”

“We're exceptionally lucky to have the fans we have,” Jean-Paul agrees. “They're diehard, and because of that, we take this that much more seriously. We do not take this for granted. We know that those folks could be anywhere else, and they've chosen to spend the evening at a Clutch show, so we're gonna do the best we can to provide them with the best musical experience we can. I think that translates to the records, because at the end of the day, all you have is your records. When this whole thing wraps up, those are gonna be the things that go down in history.”

Clutch are:

Neil Fallon – vocals & guitar
Jean-Paul Gaster – drums
Dan Maines – bass
Tim Sult – guitar
Big Business
Big Business
Big Business is a loud rock band from sunny Los Angeles. They tour, make records, and pretty much do whatever they want. But they do it CLASSY. Joking that they met at a prison rodeo, Warren and Willis's music has always had levity and sarcasm at the bottom, and at times their sound ventures into noise rock that scrambles an underlining pop sensibility. Big Business began when Willis and Warren started jamming together in 2003, after Warren's bandmate in The Whip, Scott Jernigan, died tragically in a boating accident. Big Business released its demo in 2004, and signed to Los Angeles-based Hydra Head Records to release its hell-raising debut album in 2005, the Phil Ek-produced Head For the Shallow. Described as Slayer having sex with Credence Clearwater Revival on acid, the near guitar-less album achieved the kind of low-end steam-rolling grit that would become the band's stamp on the strength of Warren's lung-scorched vocals.

Having developed a cultish following for their wild two-man live gigs, Big Business toured throughout the United States in support of Head For the Shallow before relocating to Los Angeles in 2006. After being invited to join up with the more established Melvins, Warren and Willis delivered the sinister sludge as the rhythm section (along with the regular drummer, Dale Crover) for The Melvins' monolithic album, A Senile Animal (2006 Ipecac). Warren and Willis made it clear up front that joining The Melvins wouldn't mean the end of Big Business and, after touring with the band in support of A Senile Animal (the so-called "Double-Drumming Rock for Peace Tour") as well as performing opening those sets as Big Business, Willis and Warren got right back in the studio to record their sophomore release.

This time using guitarist David Scott Stone in the recording studio (who had worked with Jello Biafra and Mike Patton, among others), Big Business turned out Here Come the Waterworks (2007 Hydra Head) with guitarist Toshi Kasai.

In 2008, the Big Business core of Warren and Willis were back in the studio as members of The Melvins to record Nude With Boots (2008 Ipecac). Not long thereafter, they were back to their own sessions, recording Mind the Drift (2009 Hydra Head) later that same year, the band's third LP. The album incorporated a wider array of instrumentation, such as synthesizers and skuzzy guitars that add to the already slow-roiling chaos of the patented sound. 2009 saw them release Biz Bot Remixes. In 2010 the band added 400 Blows guitarist Scott Martin. 2011 saw the release of Quadruple Singles, followed in 2012 by a 7" single titled Wild Kingdom.
The Inspector Cluzo
The Inspector Cluzo
Venue Information:
Pub Station Ballroom
2502 1st Ave. N
Billings, MT, 59101
http://www.thepubstation.com/