The Devil Makes Three

11:11 Presents

The Devil Makes Three

Erika Wennerstrom (of Heartless Bastards)

Thu, November 15, 2018

Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

Pub Station Ballroom

Billings, MT

$30.00

This event is all ages

The Devil Makes Three
The Devil Makes Three
"There's a road that goes out of every town. All you've got to do is get on it," Pete Bernhard says.

The guitarist/singer and his cohorts in the raw and raucous trio The Devil Makes Three have found their way onto that road numerous times since they first left their picaresque rural hometown of Brattleboro, Vermont. Back then, they had no idea it would lead them to such auspicious destinations as the Newport Folk and Austin City Limits Festivals, Bonnaroo and Lollapalooza, and on tours with Willie Nelson, Emmylou Harris and Rodney Crowell and Trampled By Turtles. Along the way, they drew numerous accolades from a growing fan base and press alike.

TDM3's travels and travails serve as inspiration for their fourth album and their New West Records debut, I'm a Stranger Here, produced by Buddy Miller and recorded at Dan Auerbach's (Black Keys) Easy Eye Sound in Nashville.

With upright bassist Lucia Turino and guitarist Cooper McBean, Bernhard crafted a dozen tunes, part road songs, part heartbreak songs and part barnburners. While most bands are propelled from behind by a drummer, TDM3 builds exuberant rhythms from the inside out, wrapping finger-picked strings and upsurging harmonies around chugging acoustic guitar and bass, plying an ever-growing audience onto its feet to jump, shake and waltz.

TDM3's sound is garage-y ragtime, punkified blues, old n' new timey without settling upon a particular era, inspired as much by mountain music as by Preservation Hall jazz. "We bend genres pretty hard," Bernhard says.

The combination could only have happened via the circuitous route each of them took to forming the band. As kids in Vermont, "all raised by sort of hippie parents" who exposed them to folk, blues and jugbands, Bernhard says, they blazed a path to nearby Boston, Massachusetts in search of punk rock shows. They found venerable venues like The Rat and The Middle East, drawn to east coast bands like the Dropkick Murphys and Aus-Rotten.

"It would be like 6 bucks for 13 bands, everyone playing for 20 minutes," Bernhard says. "I had so much fun going to shows like that. The energy coming off the stage makes a circle with the crowd and comes back. We were really attracted to that energy."

Bernhard and McBean, a multi-instrumentalist who plays banjo, musical saw and bass, forged a particular bond. Unlike most of their mutual friends, they both liked to play acoustic music, with McBean showing Bernhard the wonders of Hank Williams and Bob Wills & the Texas Playboys. They kept in touch after high school, when nearly everyone in their clique relocated to the west coast like the characters in Delbert McClinton's song "Two More Bottles of Wine."

"It was a mass exodus of kids who went out to start bands and be creative, searching for the unknown, dreaming of something different," Bernhard says. "We wanted to get away from where we were from, as many kids do, and California was the farthest we could get." Eventually they landed in sunny Santa Cruz, California, where TDM3 took shape in 2001. Their early gigs were house concerts, then small bars, punk shows, bigger rock clubs and theaters and festivals, all the while defying genre and delighting whomever turned up to listen.

Turino learned bass to join the band, but her unremitting sense of rhythm comes naturally from being raised by parents who were dance teachers, and from her own dance background. Attacking the strings of her upright, she understands how to infuse songs with the force it takes to get a crowd moving.

And the songs on I'm a Stranger Here tell the rest of the story, with the music often joyously juxtaposed against lyric darkness...the rootless nature of being in a touring band, traveling from town to town with little sense of community, represented by a devil-like character ("Stranger")...thorny transitions into adulthood...struggling with relationships ("Worse or Better"), watching friends succumb to addiction ("Mr. Midnight"), coming to terms with mortality ("Dead Body Moving"), nostalgic notions of childhood ("Spinning Like a Top"). Bernhard even considers the destruction of changing weather patterns, inspired in part by Hurricane Katrina as well as a flood that wreaked havoc in Brattleboro ("Forty Days," a gospel rave-up recorded with the Preservation Hall Jazz Band).

Bernhard wrote more than 20 songs for the album and turned them over to producer Buddy Miller, who gravitated toward the darker material but insured that the recording was lit up by the band's innate ebullience. It was Miller's idea to record at Easy Eye rather than his renowned home studio. "Easy Eye is like Sun Records," Bernhard says. "There's one live tracking room filled with amazing gear, and that defines the kind of record you're going to make. That was exactly the record we wanted to make, and we knew Buddy was the one who could capture us playing together like we do."

For a band that made its bones with dynamic performances, recording an album is almost like coaxing lightning into a bottle, but Miller and TDM3 succeed on I'm a Stranger Here. Now they're continuing the journey that began when they found their way to the road that led them out of Vermont. "I can't wait to get onstage, I love it," Bernhard says. "Playing music for a living is a blessing and a curse, but for us there's no other option."
Erika Wennerstrom (of Heartless Bastards)
Erika Wennerstrom (of Heartless Bastards)
Heartless Bastards have spent the past decade in motion, boldly pushing their unique brand of rock 'n' roll into new shapes over four acclaimed albums and nearly non-stop roadwork. Now, with RESTLESS ONES, the band sets out once again, blazing a path to a place of shifting moods, seasoned songcraft, and unbridled spontaneity. Heartless Bastards' fifth studio recording and follow-up to 2012's breakthrough ARROW, the album finds singer/songwriter Erika Wennerstrom exploring as-yet-unvisited avenues of sound and sensation, her bravery and ambition readily apparent in the emotional timbre and the sheer physicality of her songs. "Wind Up Bird" and "Into The Light" are straightforward yet stunningly sophisticated, shot through with layered guitars, atmospheric harmonies, hints of synth, and a powerhouse rhythm section adept at both subtle swing and heavy horsepower. Wennerstrom's spellbinding vocals are of course front and center, her one-of-a-kind voice as primal, cathartic, and indefinable as ever. "We took a lot of chances," Wennerstrom says, "taking the sounds in different directions in order to grow. I don't ever want to make the same album twice." Now based in Austin, the band's current incarnation – that is, guitarist Mark Nathan, bassist Jesse Ebaugh, and drummer Dave Colvin – united in 2009, touring Heartless Bastards' acclaimed third album, THE MOUNTAIN, before hitting the studio to record ARROW. ARROW proved popular success, earning Heartless Bastards' top album and track sales to date, fueled by multi-format rock radio airplay across the land, high-profile placements on a wide range of highly rated network programming, rave reviews in the likes of Rolling Stone, NPR, Entertainment Weekly, and show-stopping performances on such TV shows as NBC's Friday Night Lights, CBS' Late Show with David Letterman, TBS' Conan, and ABC's Jimmy Kimmel Live!The band celebrated with furious roadwork, including sold out headline tours and memorable appearances at such famed festivals as Bonnaroo Music & Arts Festival, Lollapalooza, Pickathon, Hangout Music Festival, Summerfest, Wakarusa Music Festival, Firefly Music Festival, and Austin's own ACL Music Festival and Fun Fun Fun Fest. Having spent the better part of two years on tour, summer 2014 saw Heartless Bastards humming on all cylinders and ready to commence work on their next record. Wennerstrom began honing in on the myriad ideas she had accumulated, developing melodies and arrangements though not yet committing lyrics to paper. She experimented with vowel and consonant noises, toying with untested sounds and instrumentation. GRAMMY® Award-winning producer John Congleton (St. Vincent, Angel Olsen, Swans) was tasked with corralling Heartless Bastards' collective energy. The band made significant inroads during pre-production sessions, tightening songs and structures but still leaving things open to chance. "John came down to Austin and sat in with us for a couple of days," says Nathan. "That was really great – it was important to get an outside ear and it helped make the process more concise. I've never seen anybody get sounds as good and as quickly as he does."

"These songs are about what's happening now," Colvin says, "about not looking too far ahead or back. John is a real decisive person, which is great for us as players. He helped us to capture the moment and not worry about it." RESTLESS ONES was tracked in August 2014 during a 10-day session at El Paso's renowned Sonic Ranch. Located on 2,300 acres of pecan orchards bordering the Rio Grande and Mexico, the studio – the largest residential recording complex in the world – provided the perfect setting, miles away from all real world responsibilities and thus able to fully invest themselves in the act of creation. "When you record in the city you all live in, it's easy for people to just come in and out of the studio," Wennerstrom says, "so vocals and guitar parts and overdubs are often recorded without anyone else hearing them. Recording at Sonic Ranch was a way for everyone in the band to experience the creative process and to be able to offer opinions in real time." The band put their back into the project as one, living together, dining together, always alert to their mission. The communal nature and concentrated schedule of the Sonic Ranch sessions proved an intense but inspirational combination. "There was no break from the process," says Nathan. "In some ways, it made the good things better and the bad things worse, but looking back, it was a different experience and I'm glad we did it." "Sonic Ranch attracts talent from all over the Americas," Ebaugh says. "We met people from Chile, Argentina, Mexico City. It helps you contextualize your own work to be shoulder to shoulder with other artists from backgrounds so different from your own. It makes you think twice as hard about what you are saying, about your life, and your background artistically." The sessions were marked by Heartless Bastards' openness to the unfamiliar, allowing previously untapped influences – from The Byrds and Syd Barrett to the Faces and the Flaming Lips – to take root in their own distinctive blues-powered rock 'n' roll. "Wind Up Bird" is given texture and psychedelic lift via a visit from keyboardist John Baggott (Robert Plant's Sensational Space Shifters, Portishead, Massive Attack), while the album-closing "Tristessa" was born of Wennerstrom's home experiments with guitar loops but then grown by the band into a deeply devotional drone. "We started with sketches and ideas of directions," Ebaugh says, "but allowed the process of discovery to guide the finalization. It allowed us to think about the songs more globally and really flesh them out." "There were some happy accidents," Colvin says. "Things that were completely organic, that could've only happened in that moment. Things are still shifting, nothing's set in stone." Where some tracks were built from the ground up, others were completely upended. First recorded for the soundtrack to 2013's acclaimed Winter In The Blood, "Hi-Line" was broken down and retooled from front porch folk to Fleetwood Mac-inspired country pop unlike anything in Heartless Bastards' prior canon.

"'Eastern Wind' provided a bit of a road map for the record," she says. "It's a song of wanderlust. Writing words is always a real challenge for me, so I end up taking off in my car and roaming around by myself looking for inspiration. I think in doing that I'm taking myself out of my comfort zone. I turn my world upside down over and over and start anew." Further insight came from such literary touchstones as Haruki Murakami ("Wind Up Bird"), Jack Kerouac ("Tristessa"), and the late photojournalist/artist/activist Dan Eldon, whose Be Here Nowphilosophy is at the very heart of RESTLESS ONES. "I love the idea of 'The Journey Is The Destination,'" she says, referencing Eldon's most famous work. "Not looking too far ahead and really focusing on the present. I've tended to look so forward that I forget to stop and smell the roses. The process of working towards the things you want in your life is more important than the goal itself." "As always, Erika's lyrical honesty informs the behavior of the whole project," says Ebaugh. "There comes a time in an artist's trajectory when you realize that your entire life experience is expressed through the work, so you better be able to relax and let the work reflect the experience that is yours." RESTLESS ONES was finished in the fall with two mixing sessions at Congleton's Elmwood Recording in Dallas. Heartless Bastards' next challenge is bringing the album's studio-crafted songs to the stage. "It'll be fun to chuck it all at the wall and let the collective experience of band/audience dictate the conversation of the music," Ebaugh says. "That's the mission ultimately: rock 'n' roll communion." Rich with purpose, passion, and commanding musicianship, RESTLESS ONES captures an idiosyncratic band exploring their craft and soul in an effort to reach a place that's both true and transcendent. Heartless Bastards continue to drive their monumental music ever forward, towards hidden vistas and horizons still unseen.
Venue Information:
Pub Station Ballroom
2502 1st Ave. N
Billings, MT, 59101
http://www.thepubstation.com/